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Electronic music

Electronic music has started to seriously interest me in the mid-90s Berlin (20th century), when I was in my late twenties. However, it was much earlier - when I realised that I was useless at playing the guitar - that I began fantasising about composing with the computer. But unfortunately in those years special software such as Fruity Loops or Cubase were not yet available for the amateurish enthusiasts with little money in their pockets. Amongst all the major Techno trends I came across, I personally mostly enjoy Trance, especially Goa and Progressive. It’s maybe also because since my early thirties I’ve always felt a little awkward in the dance floor, and attended only one or two of the big raves, that I think that the future of electronic music, with particular relation to Surround Sound and 3D audio effects, could be - and should be - something that extends across many new, diverse and unconventional shapes. There is a lot of scope for exploration.

Digital motors

“The bumper car” is the first track I have ever composed, and features in my comic recording “Vutu che te la conti o che te la diga ? (Do you want me to say it or recount it for you?) ”. I had started everything a long time ago, by putting together random sounds I liked. Then it soon became apparent that the things I was doing had all something in common; they were all reminiscent of raging engines or electrical devices roaring, bursting, thundering, decaying, jamming or bumping into each other in the various spooky atmospheres. I am not sure what kind of genre this music could be classed under. All I know is that I just followed my inspiration and my taste, drawing a bit from the funk bass tradition, a bit from techno, and a bit from jazz and fusion. In a way that should just about be able to inspire the inebriated amongst you who are in need of a bebop on the kitchen tables. I hope you will enjoy listening.



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DIGITAL MOTORS (mp3)

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